New Book | Understanding and Supporting Refugee Children and Young People

A Practical Resource for Teachers, Parents and Carers of Those Exposed to the Trauma of War.

 – Dr Tina Rae

“This book is the go-to resource for those parents and professionals seeking to support children through the trauma of war and conflict.”

Direct link: https://www.routledge.com/Understanding-and-Supporting-Refugee-Children-and-Young-People-A-Practical/Rae/p/book/9781032405506

A free webinar for education professionals exploring the experience of neurodiverse professionals working in schools and colleges and how colleagues can be supported in the workplace.

In Conversation with Matt Carpenter and Gemma Alldritt,

Tue, Feb 7, 2023 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM GMT

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7689815427479625310

Webinar flyer

Implementing Engagement

Teachers are growing in familiarity and confidence in the use of the Engagement Model, which became statutory summative assessment in September 2021.

They are realising its potential for a whole range of children ‘not engaged in subject specific learning’.  As such,  pedagogy is developing that supports classroom based formative assessment , and leads into the statutory summative assessment for EHCP meetings, Annual Reviews etc .

Teachers wishing to look deeper into the potential of Engagement ,and its evidence base , may wish to look at this podcast ‘What you really need to know about Engagement’, presented by Bev Cockbill and Professor Barry Carpenter.

https://www.evidenceforlearning.net/learningshared/engagement-part-1-what-you-really-need-to-know-about-engagement/

Cues & Clues: Early Indicators of Autism in Young Girls

This Poster will be presented at the International Conference on Early Intervention, in Chicago, USA , on 28th September 2022. 

Oxford Brookes University awards Honorary Doctorate to Barry Carpenter CBE, OBE

Barry Carpenter, of Chaddesley Corbett in Worcestershire, has been awarded an Honorary Doctor of Letters after showing incredible commitment to education for children with special needs across his 40-year career.

Barry has a life-long association with Oxford Brookes University, notably the Harcourt Hill Campus from his days as a student at Westminster College (as it was then known) between 1973 and 1976. He was then a Principal Lecturer from 1992 until 1997, during which time he established the Centre for the Study of Special Education. 

Barry said: “My career began and ended with Oxford Brookes, as a student on the Harcourt Hill Campus during the 1970s and finally as Professor of Mental Health in Education, a personal Chair created in response to the national crisis in children’s mental wellbeing. “It has been a life enriching, career shaping association for me, enabling me to promote the love I have of teaching society’s most vulnerable children. I am profoundly moved that the University has chosen to acknowledge this lifelong association, and the impact of the career they prepared me for.”

Barry is the UK’s first Professor in Mental Health in Education, which is a Chair created for him at Oxford Brookes. Barry has also been a Fellow of the University of Oxford. In July 2020 he was awarded the distinguished Fellowship of the Chartered College of Teaching, for his leadership in the field of Education during the Covid-19 pandemic. Barry has also been awarded an OBE and CBE by the Queen for his services to children with special needs.

In 2009, Barry was appointed as National Director of the Children with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities Research Project, by the Secretary of State for Education. His work on Engagement as Pedagogy has recently been revisited by the Department for Education, and is now the statutory model of assessment for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities.

Away from his professional life, Barry has three children. His son is School Principal of Baxter College in Worcestershire; his youngest daughter, also an Oxford Brookes graduate, is a Senior Occupational Therapist in Mental Health. His third child, who has Down’s syndrome, now has a home of her own and published her first book in 2017. She was on an apprenticeship as a teaching assistant; however she has since decided to become an actress! 

Barry Carpenter with honours doctorate

Visual Supports

Many children with SEND have dominant learning pathways which are right hemisphere based, and therefore visual (as opposed to auditory-vocal) modalities are the most successful routes to learning.

These new Guidelines on Visual Supports, (from the South Australia Education Department) may offer some useful insights to Teachers and Teaching Assistants new to this approach.