Early Childhood Education and Care

Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) refers to education and childcare provided in regulated settings from birth to the start of primary school. This POSTnote summarises the evidence on the association between ECEC and children’s development in England and the key factors that affect this.

It also covers the impact of government-funded ECEC places on families and the sector, and stakeholder perspectives on public policy priorities.

New report – Adolescent mental health: A systematic review on the effectiveness of school-based interventions. from the Early Intervention Foundation

This broad report looks at a wide range of mental health concerns and potential responses that schools can make, examining the latest evidence on the effectiveness of interventions designed to:

  • enhance young people’s mental health and wellbeing
  • prevent or reduce mental health problems, including anxiety, depression and suicidality
  • address behavioral difficulties, including bullying, aggression and sexual violence or harassment.

Link to download: Adolescent mental health: A systematic review on the effectiveness of school-based interventions | Early Intervention Foundation (eif.org.uk)

Episode 24: Well Being – Plans and Possibilities

LearningShared Episode 24 Well Being Conference Plans and Possibilities (Conference 29th June 2021)

This episode is a recording of the online conference and webinar on the topic Well Being that was held on 29th June 2021. The event and this recording contains presentations and talks from national leaders in the field of mental health, well being, trauma informed practice and psychology including Professor Barry Carpenter CBE OBE FCCT, Dr Tina Rae, Sharon Gray OBE and Laura Purser, as well as 5 school based practitioners and leaders from a wide range of settings and contexts.

Presenters and panellists:

  • Prof Barry Carpenter CBE OBE FCCT (Prof. Mental Health in Education, Oxford Brookes University)
  • Dr Tina Rae (Child Psychologist. Prolific & award winning author)
  • Sharon Gray OBE (Former-Headteacher. Former-Ofsted Inspector. Member of the Youth Justice Board, Wholehearted Learning)
  • Laura Purser (Head of Primary, Prep & EYFS at University of Buckingham. Designs/leads master’s level NASENCO course.)
  • Alison Wheeler (Headteacher, Palmerston School)
  • Alex Tomkins (Deputy Headteacher, Greenside School)
  • Jeanette Scull (Deputy Headteacher, John F Kennedy School)
  • Jonah Stancombe (Assistant Principal, Bridge College)
  • Tom Thatcher (PSHE Lead, St Hugh’s Special School)

Professor Carpenter writes…

The pandemic period has witnessed a rapid erosion in the mental health of children. National figures are worrying, but as ever, as Teachers, we must ask ‘how does this affect children’s learning, and how can we remove barriers to achievement generated by issues such as anxiety, trauma and loss?” 

Two major Curriculum initiatives from this September will enhance the foundations created, pre pandemic, of Mental Health Leads in school, Mental Heath First Aid Training, etc:
 

Firstly, for all children, the new DfE Relationships, Health and Sex Education (RHSE) Curriculum becomes statutory. With its clear focus on Mental Well Being and Relationships, these are perfect platforms for rebuilding each school’s curriculum on meaningful human values, with RSHE at its heart, … for teaching is a relationship based profession.

Secondly, for children with SEND, the implementation of the Rochford Review recommendations, not only brings the Engagement Model into play as statutory summative assessment, but sees a renewed emphasis on the 4 domains of SEND in the Code of Practice (2015) as the curriculum framework for children with an EHCP. As such Social, Emotional and Mental Health, (SEMH), is a vital platform for designing learning opportunities for children with EHCPs.

Evidence for Learning has a strong history of facilitating curriculum development, pedagogy, assessment and practice in the area of Mental Well Being (MWB) through a variety of strategies.”

Alongside Prof. Barry Carpenter, presenters included national leaders and experts in the field – Dr Tina Rae, Sharon Gray OBE, and Laura Purser – together with school based practitioners – Alison Wheeler, Alex Tomkins, Jeanette Scull, Jonah Stancombe and Tom Thatcher – for a rich and comprehensive collection of presentations and sharing of knowledge, ideas and practice that you are invited to take back to your own schools for your own discussions, planning and CPLD.

This episode is packed full of valuable ideas and insights, with colleagues sharing knowledge, ideas and practice that you are invited to take back to your own schools for your own discussions, planning and CPLD.

Episode 21: Family Centred Practice – Talking to families. Listening to families Working with families

This podcast exalts Schools to shift the focus from partnership with parents to partnership with families; to embrace a more holistic and inclusive approach which values the contributions of all family members involved in a Childs life.
At its loftiest this is a paradigm shift to more Family centred practice; in its practical reality it is about adjusting your school newsletter to read ‘dear families’, instead of ‘dear parents’.

In 21st-century Society, when so much childcare is delivered by family members other than parents, do we truly value their contribution ? Does it matter if the home – school liaison diary is completed by a grandparent ? Where is the ‘SibShop’ workshop event in the school calendar to enable siblings to come together for fun activities whilst bonding with other siblings whose life journey is also as a brother/ sister to a child with special educational needs/ disabilities ?
Such approaches will enrich the practice of our schools, and the lives of our families, as the speakers in this podcast powerfully illustrate.

LearningShared Episode 21 about Family Centred Practice

Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) .. cont

Children with Acquired Brain Injury ( ABI ) are often an overlooked group, particularly in Mainstream schools.

Attached is an article just published by Cath Bate and Colleagues. Cath was part of a group of Teachers in Surrey , that I led through school focused, inquiry based projects a few years ago . She has gone on from that experience to study for an MSc, and deepen her knowledge and insight in this field.

This is a rare gem of an article, offering some rich insights.

It was recently published in JORSEN. https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-3802.12517

ADHD in Girls – Fintan O’Regan

There is growing interest in how ADHD may present itself in girls. As with Autism , there are gender related issues and profiles linked to the social biology of the brain.


This short overview article by Fintan O’Regan, offers some valuable insights and useful  observational starting points for the classroom teacher. 


https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.goodschoolsguide.co.uk/special-educational-needs/types-of-sen/adhd-in-girls/amp