Sport Sanctuaries – does your school have one? 

In this innovative Think Piece, Victoria Wells from the Youth Sports Trust, asks the central question  Could ‘sport sanctuaries’ in schools help young people recover from the impact of a pandemic?
Her ideas are strongly allied to the 5 levers in the Recovery Curriculum , especially meta-cognition and space.
In the week when Ofsted published evidence (10th November), on the ‘mental distress’ and erosion of mental health in our Children and Young People , we have to find ways that enable the CYP themselves to self regulate their mood and re build their resilience. Exercise, for all of its well known benefits, offers this at all levels for all learners.
We highly recommend this piece to you, and look forward to seeing examples of good practice emerging from this thought provoking piece.
Barry and Matthew Carpenter .
November 2020.
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Reflections on a Recovery Curriculum: A conversation with Barry Carpenter, Professor of Mental Health

https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9069390241517907212?aa=aa&dm_i=BBQ,72RT8,EA35SV,SL1PY,1

Date: Thu, Oct 22, 2020 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM BST

How do children cope with loss? How can anxiety impact their ability to learn? And how can we reignite children’s motivation to learn, in a world that is dramatically changing?

Join experts from Oxford Brookes’ MA Education programme to explore the Recovery Curriculum, a relationships-based approach to developing mental wellbeing in children. We’ll examine how a curriculum can respond to children’s emotional needs – and make sense of their experiences. And in a world where our students – and indeed ourselves – are coping with untold stress, we’ll look at how we can prioritise emotional wellbeing across whole school communities.

With Jonathan Reid, MA Education SEND Strand Leader and Senior Lecturer in Child Development, SEND and Inclusion at Oxford Brookes University Barry Carpenter, Professor of Mental Health, Oxford Brookes University

Lenny and Lily: wordless stories for primary school children – download for free.

Lenny and Lily in Lockdown and Lenny and Lily Return to School will help children make sense of their experiences during the coronavirus pandemic, communicate their feelings and prepare for more change as they go back to the classroom. As the stories are told in pictures alone, it is not necessary for children to be able to read words to enjoy them. This means they are appropriate for pupils in both mainstream and special education settings.

Supporting text at the end of each story gives teaching staff and parents guidance on how to use the stories with children.

Both stories are structured around the 5 Losses and 5 Levers of the Recovery Curriculum – www.recoverycurriculum.org

Both stories are available to download for free in time for the start of the new term from: www.booksbeyondwords.co.uk/lenny-and-lily-childrens-stories

 

Lenny and Lily in Lockdown book coverLenny and Lily Return to School book cover

 

 

Department for Education Webinar: Supporting pupil and student mental wellbeing

The Department for Education, in collaboration with NHS England and Public Health England, hosted this free webinar for school and college staff on 9 July on how to support returning pupils and students mental wellbeing. You will hear from experts on the impacts of the pandemic on children and young people’s mental wellbeing and recovery techniques, and from education leaders about the actions they have been taking.

Fellowship Lecture: Chartered College of Teaching

On Tuesday 14th July, Professor Dame Alison Peacock, CEO of the Chartered College of Teaching, awarded Professor Barry Carpenter with a Fellowship of the College for his distinguished service to Education.

Webinar: A Recovery Curriculum: Reconnection, Re-igniting and Resilience