Girls and Autism Book launched to the Press today

Girls & Autism BannerToday the newly published book – Girls and Autism: Education, Family and Personal Perspectives (Routledge) has been launched to the Press. Edited by Barry Carpenter, Francesca Happe and Jo Egerton, the book has already been well received by the professional press:-

“What stands out most from this new, highly informative and skilfully edited collection are the lived experiences of the contributors; presented as honest and open accounts by girls, young and adult women describing the way autism affects their relationships with the world around them… For any social worker with an interest in the life course development of girls to adolescents to young adults this book will provide a heartfelt and highly informative insight into the lives of vulnerable and often marginalised females.”

— Mark Goodman, British Journal of Social Work

“This book is essentially very positive despite the unflinching descriptions of the complexities of life and school and the barriers that exist for girls with autism. It maintains a focus on what is possible and what is achievable even with the current reality for the majority of poorly coordinated support and insufficient services. It is a highly recommended read both for parents and for professionals working in or with schools, colleges, career services, as well as the health and social care sectors.”

— Dr Rob Ashdown, Editor, PMLD Link

This has been echoed in this lived experience interview with Talia Grant , a young woman with Asperger’s syndrome , in “ The Independent “ today .

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/opinion/comment/hollyoaks-talia-grant-autism-representation-tv-books/

On Twitter , members of the female , wrote “It’s wonderful, our community are VERY happy.

https://www.routledge.com/Girls-and-Autism-Educational-Family-and-Personal-Perspectives-1st-Edition/Carpenter-Happe-Egerton-Hollins/p/book/9780815377269

ISEI 2019 Conference Sydney, Australia – Focus Autism

25 – 28 June 2019 | International Convention Centre Sydney, Australia

Full details available via the below link:

http://www.dcconferences.com.au/isei2019/Home

ISEI 2019 Conference Focus - Autism Advert

Review of Collaborative Approaches to Learning for Pupils with PDA: strategies for education professionals

Collaborative Approaches to learning for pupils with PDA book flyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review Collaborative Approaches to Learning for Pupils with PDA Oct 18 – click to open & view (word.doc – will download separately)

Autism and Girls

The Article below appeared in the Guardian (15th September 2018), giving new evidence and insight into the female presentation of Autism.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/sep/14/thousands-of-autistic-girls-and-women-going-undiagnosed-due-to-gender-bias

The article is based on an interview with Professor Francesca Happe, who is co – Editor of a forthcoming book on Autism and Girls, (details below)

Autism And Girls Book Flyer

‘My Invisible Disability’ by Caitlin Hire (New Publication)

Caitlin Hire is a young woman with Autism, who through her teenage years has also experienced some issues with her Mental Health.
Through it all she has shown incredible inner strength and emotional resilience .

This is her story, in her own words, of her journey with Autism. She talks specifically about her struggles with the conventional school system, an experience common to many teenagers with AS.

Her story is full of insight , and will be a revelation to so many other young people, their families and professionals. Her account is poignant, and is told with great candour..”Masking is exhausting, but it’s what I need to do in this neurotypical world to survive.”

Caitlin has given permission for her story to be shared more widely, and ‘BarryCarpenterEducation’ is delighted to offer it as a free download below in .pdf format.

Click the cover image below to open & view Caitlin’s story.

Caitlin Hire - My Invisible Disability eBook cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girls & Autism (Forthcoming Book for 2018)

Girls and Autism

Educational, Family and Personal Perspectives by Barry Carpenter, Francesca Happe and Jo Egerton.

Click the thumbnail image below to download and view in full.Girls & Autism Upcoming Book Summary - thumbnail

 

“Let’s Talk Autism”

New article: ‘Let’s Talk Autism’ -a school-based project for students to explore and share their experiences of being autistic

Kathryn Stevenson, Katie Cornell and Vivian Hinchcliffe

Understanding what autism means on a personal level can be an important process for young people on the autistic spectrum, and being able to reflect on this and discuss with autistic peers can be particularly helpful. However, opportunities may be restricted by reluctance to talk about diagnosis and because of difficulties in communication inherent in autism. This article describes a therapeutic media project within an ASD school that attempted to support young people to reflect together about what autism meant for them and create resources to share with others.

The process is described and main themes of discussions analysed using thematic analysis. Main themes emerged of making sense of diagnosis, experiences of difference and transition to adulthood. Various strategies to manage diagnosis and negotiate identity also emerged. Issues around informed consent and confidentiality and the therapeutic value of such groups are discussed.

Lets Talk Autism Article Thumbnail
Click thumbnail to view full PDF file(s).

Engagement 4 Learning flyer thumbnail image

 

 

Supporting Girls on the Autism Spectrum

Supporting girls on the autism spectrum.

Barry Carpenter and Jo Egerton

Nasen, the UK’s leading organisation supporting those who work with or care for children and young people with special and additional educational needs and disabilities (SEND), has launched a free miniguide to supporting girls with autism spectrum conditions/disorder (ASC/ASD).

Girls and Autism: Flying under the radar, is a 20-page full-colour guide designed to alert busy teachers to the hidden struggles of girls with ASC/ASD. Misunderstanding of their support needs, it suggests, may lead to unnecessary school exclusion and mental health disorders.

Behaviours stereotypically associated with autism are now widely recognised by most teachers – the high-intensity interests (e.g. trains, mechanisms, dinosaurs) and the self-regulatory and anxiety-associated behaviours (e.g. flapping, jumping, resonating noises, meltdowns). However, now researchers are warning that these behaviours are not equally indicative of ASC/ASD in both boys and girls.

‘Ironically, it seems we, as professionals, have been over-focused on the detail and not seen the bigger picture,’ says co-author Jo Egerton. ‘It is not the object of interest that is key, but the extreme intensity and duration of interest that sets girls and boys with autism apart from their typically developing peers.’

A young girl with autism may, for example, collect hundreds of identical pictures of her favourite pop star or develop an unusually encyclopaedic knowledge of fashion, Egerton says.

‘Rather than externalising their ASC behaviours, it seems that girls are more likely than their male peers to suppress them, to assiduously study and copy peers’ socially acceptable behaviours, and to adopt more internalised and invisible relief from stress (e.g. self-harm, eating disorders).’

This means that their ASC/ASD is likely to go unnoticed, she adds, unless their school knows how girls with autism ‘fly under the radar’.

The Girls and Autism miniguide – which comes out of the UK’s National Association of Head Teachers’ Autism and Girls Forum chaired by Professor Barry Carpenter CBE – is a first step for teachers in becoming more informed. It introduces the debate around autism and gender; identifies key issues for girls with ASC/ASD; provides practical school-based support strategies; shares family, professional and academic perspectives; and signposts further reading.

‘Our challenge in schools is to evolve a curriculum and pedagogy that are responsive to our new understanding of girls with ASC/ASD and their specific needs,’ Professor Carpenter says. ‘This will involve a process of inquiry, to investigate and explore, for and with the girls, how best their needs can be met.’

You can download your free copy of Girls and Autism: Flying under the radar here.

For the National Conference on Girls on the Autism Spectrum ; The BIG Shout, to be held in London on 27th January 2017.please click here http://www.naht.org.uk/welcome/naht-events/conferences/girls-on-the-autism-spectrum-the-big-shout-conference/