Mental Health Article – Inquiring Minds

Jo Egerton, Schools Research Consultant, and Bev Cockbill, Training Co-ordinator and Structured Teaching Practitioner in complex learning needs, Chadsgrove Teaching School, Bromsgrove, write about the use of mental wealth journals for pupils with additonal needs.

Click thumbnail/image below to view full pdf.

Inquiring Minds Article Thumbnail

Engagement – From Principles to Practice

Read the first blog post on the new E4L – Engagement4Learning website.
Written by Professor Barry Carpenter.

Related Content:
Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities – (2015)

Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities

Chair of the Rochford Review Endorses Complex Needs Book

Diane Rochford, the Chair of the Government’s Review on Assessment for children with SEND, has endorsed the popular book:

“Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities:A resource book for teachers and teaching assistants, (Routledge)”

“In the light of Government reforms in the assessment of children with SEND this is extremely timely. The book is profoundly significant in that it does what teaching was meant for and that is to place the child at the heart of learning”

– Diane Rochford

Acknowledging that the book is being widely used by Teachers and others in a variety of settings , the publishers are offering a 20% discount for a limited period. (see below):

This book is available to purchase direct from Routledge:

https://www.routledge.com/Engaging-Learners-with-Complex-Learning-Difficulties-and-Disabilities/Carpenter-Egerton-Cockbill-Bloom-Fotheringham-Rawson-Thistlethwaite/p/book/9780415812740

Click the thumbnail below for the review and discount details:

Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities
Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities. A resource book for teachers and teaching
assistants

The Engagement Framework for Learning; how did it start ?

In this new article Professor Carpenter, former Director of the DfE funded  Project on Children with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities, discusses what new teaching and learning approaches are required to truly meet the needs of the children. Research has shown that Engagement is the key to successful learning for these children, and, indeed, any child with Special Needs.
The article describes how the Engagement Framework for Learning (including the Profile and Scale) evolved, how it was extensively trialled  across the UK and internationally, and how is commends itself as a personalised assessment approach that celebrates children’s learning, and empowers the quality of teaching. Prof Barry Carpenter SEND May 2016.
Please click the thumbnail below to open and view the full document:
Resisting Engagement Cover

The Legislative Context ; a free on line module explaining the new Code of Practice on SEND, and allied legislation.

Following the work of its Complex Needs Review Group , Chaired by Professor Barry Carpenter,  nasen is delighted to announce the publication of the latest free legislative updates to the Complex Needs training materials.

This comprehensive online update sets out the most pressing legal responsibilities above and beyond the Children and Families Act 2014.

Whether you’re a SENCO, teacher, teaching assistant, governor or manager, these slide-based online materials are a rich resource designed with you in mind.

Access the key information that you’ll need for your school and ensure that you meet all of the necessary legal requirements for your setting.

http://complexneeds.org.uk/modules/Module-1.2-The-legislative-context-edition-2/All/m02p010a.html

How to engage a child with Profound Autistic Spectrum Disorder in learning

See link below:
 
Article just published: Jones, P.; Churilla, I.; Demes, A.; Sadlo, R.; Sweeney, M.; & Pastore, H. (2015). Finding Ferdy: A Collaborative Inquiry About a Student with Complex Disabilities, The Canadian Journal for Teacher Research, 3.

Children with Complex Needs

When a child has Complex Learning Needs , there is no ‘quick fix’. The teacher will need to investigate, explore, search , to find out more about the styles of learning that will be effective in truly engaging the child. This is a process of Inquiry , that goes hand in hand with evidence based practice.
This was an inherent component of the national Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities Research Project in the UK, – (http://complexld.ssatrust.org.uk)

This new article by Dr Phyllis Jones and colleagues exemplifies how the process of Engagement , as the basis for effective pedagogy, links collaboratively with the Teacher process of Inquiry .

Article just published: Jones, P.; Churilla, I.; Demes, A.; Sadlo, R.; Sweeney, M.; & Pastore, H. (2015). Finding Ferdy: A Collaborative Inquiry About a Student with Complex Disabilities, The Canadian Journal for Teacher Research, 3,

http://www.teacherresearch.ca/blog/article/2015/12/27/283-finding-ferdy-a-collaborative-inquiry-about-a-student-with-complex-disabilities.

New EU Project on children with Complex Needs

This week a new EU funded Erasmus Project was launched in Graz, Austria.  This Project will take the extensively trialled Briefing Sheets for the UK CLDD Project ( http://complexld.ssatrust .org.uk) , and translate them into several European languages.

 

The briefing sheets will then be used to support Inclusion of children with Special Needs in the representative EU countries .The Project will go through various trial and development phases, through to 2018.

 

For more information please go to http://eurlyinclusion.eu

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

The Changing Landscape of Special Educational Needs

This two part article, recently published in the new SEND magazine, gives an overview of the phenomena that many school are experiencing , namely that the children they identify with SEND today, are increasingly different to those they identified yesterday.

SEND Article Part 1

SEND Article Part 2