How to Talk to Children and Young People About War | Understanding and Supporting our Refugee Children. By Dr Tina Rae

The recording of this wonderful webinar, full of practical suggestions, can be found on: https://www.evidenceforlearning.net/ dr_ tina_ rae_children_war_refugees

Check out the resources on War Child – www.childandwar.org/resources

Mental Health and Children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities 

Margaret Mulholland | SEND & Inclusion Policy Specialist

Association of School and College Leaders interviews Professor Barry Carpenter , Professor of Mental Health in Education , Oxford Brookes University 

(Podcast recorded March 2022)

https://www.ascl.org.uk/podcasts/send

Anxiety; Cues, Clues & Support for Young People in School – Ask the Expert

Below is the recording of the webinar from 27th January 2022; speakers –  Professor Cathy Creswell and Helen Manley, University of Oxford . 

https://www.acamh.org/freeview/anxiety-cues-clues-support-for-young-people-in-school-ask-the-expert-recording/

Webinars on Sleep and Screen Time

The Association of Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH) are developing webinars exploring topics from the new Relationship, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) curriculum.

Two recordings of the webinars on Sleep and Screen Time are below.


Sleep – https://www.acamh.org/freeview/ask-the-expert-improving-childrens-sleep-the-role-a-teacher-can-play-recording/

Screen Time –  https://www.acamh.org/freeview/ask-expert-screen-time/


Refocusing on ADHD in Education: a new resource booklet for SENCOs

 

“This is a ‘must read’ for every teacher concerned with the education of children with ADHD. Lots of practical suggestions, and new insights. Look at page 21 on the latest thinking around ADHD in Girls!”

Professor Barry Carpenter, CBE.(Patron: ADHD Foundation)

Click here, or below to download and view

Professor Carpenter inducted as Patron of the ADHD Foundation

On a visit to the ADHD Foundation Headquarters in Liverpool earlier in October , Professor Barry Carpenter, was inducted at a Patron of the Foundation ( the Neurodiversity Charity, ) by Dr Tony Lloyd, CEO ( seen in the picture above.)

He joins other Patrons – Rory Bremner, Simon Weston, Alison Moyet and Patricia Kelly – in promoting the work of the Foundation.

In accepting this new role, Professor Carpenter said :

“It is a real honour to join the hardworking team at the ADHD Foundation, promoting the needs of neurodiverse children, whose complex needs are often not recognised and responded too.The Charity’s approach is both refreshing and groundbreaking, and their new insights and innovations, offer much from which others can learn. I , for one, look forward to going on that learning journey , encouraging others to do so, and asking them to support the important, ongoing work in whatever way they can.”


Dr Tony Lloyd , Chief Executive of the ADHD Foundation said:

Further details about the ADHD Foundation : the Neurodiversity Charity can be found at www.adhdfoundation.org.uk

“We are delighted to welcome such an internationally renowned academic and pioneering mind who is influencing our national conversation about the well-being and education of children, as a Patron of the ADHD Foundation Neurodiversity Charity. Professor Carpenter CBE will collaborate with us as we continue to enable children to thrive in education and achieve their potential”

Further details about the ADHD Foundation : the Neurodiversity Charity can be found at www.adhdfoundation.org.uk

May be an image of 2 people and people standing

ADHD in Girls – Fintan O’Regan

There is growing interest in how ADHD may present itself in girls. As with Autism , there are gender related issues and profiles linked to the social biology of the brain.


This short overview article by Fintan O’Regan, offers some valuable insights and useful  observational starting points for the classroom teacher. 


https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.goodschoolsguide.co.uk/special-educational-needs/types-of-sen/adhd-in-girls/amp

Confident championing: A grounded theory of parental adjustment following a child’s diagnosis of developmental disability. 

When a child with a disability arrives in a family the messages of condolence are often greater than those of congratulation.

The history of parenting a child with special needs or a disability is littered with bereavement, ‘loss’  and sadness concepts, putting negative connotations  around the parenting process.

Parents are often labelled ‘warrior parents’,  as they fight for the rights to services and provision for their child.

This newly published article describes collaborative research with  Dr Anne Connor and Dr Barry Coughlan of the Clinical Psychology programme, at the Univeristy of Limerick in Ireland .

Through this research we have evolved and tested the concept of’ “Confident Championing “ to frame the positive endeavors of parents of children with developmental disabilities, and to bring a different lens to viewing their efforts on behalf of their child and family.

Please click here, or the icon below to open and view,
Confident championing - article