How do children born prematurely learn?

This is question I am often asked. My key thought in responding is that these children are often ‘wired differently’ – their brains are not configured as those of a full term infant might be. This does not automatically imply that they will have a learning disability or special educational need, but teachers need to be prepared that that these children may not perceive and deduct from information given, in the ways we usually expect from children.

Indeed, to repeat again the phrase given to me by the mother of a boy born at 24 weeks gestation after observing his first term in school, he is ‘wired differently’ . As a as a Teacher I then have so ask , “so of he is wired differently , in what ways does he learn differently ? And when I know how he learns differently, in what ways do I teach differently?”

Many teachers find the Engagement Profile (http://engagement4learning.com), a useful observational tool to profile neurodiversity in children, particularly as we start a new academic year.

This article may guide and refresh thinking around how we engage children whose learning pathways are different due to prematurity of birth.

Professor Barry Carpenter CBE,OBE,PhD.

September, 2018

Prematurity and the challenge for educators
Prematurity and the challenge for educators, SEND Magazine Article 2015

 

Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. – Refreshing the debate

Of late there has been a renewed interest in FASD, and the consequences for both Children’s Services and Schools.

The article below may make a helpful contribution to those discussions. Click the article thumbnail to view.

Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders . Refreshing the debate article - click to download

 

Updates on Autism Research

Teachers often need and appreciate brief, teacher-friendly summaries of relevant research in the field of Autism. The University of Portsmouth autism network posts helpful newsletters on different topics, covering research that can inform evidence based practice and interventions that are systematically trialled.

Take a look through the below weblink.

http://www.port.ac.uk/department-of-psychology/community-collaboration/autism-research-network/

 

Encouraging literacy in children with SEN

After all the debate and politically driven ideology about teaching reading only via Phonics , this article reminds us powerfully why we teach reading , and how holistic approaches are probably more successful with children with SEND.

A child’s first experiences with books and stories, paper and crayons build the foundation for language, reading and writing.

“Teaching language and literacy via the use of books demands the highest quality teaching. This in turn requires knowledge, insight and curiosity about how children learn and develop alongside their unique interests and needs,” writes Kathryn Solly. Kathryn explains how children with SEN can become inspired about books and reading.

https://www.communityplaythings.co.uk/learning-library/articles/inspiring-reading?source=pal178

Valuing the views of children with a learning disability

Engaging with children and young people with severe or profound and multiple learning disabilities.

Click cover image below to open and view article in full.

Valuing the views of children with a learning disability

New Module on Educational Inclusion in Europe

This new module, resulting from the pan European Erasmus Project, examined inclusive practice for children with Complex Needs across 8 European Countries. The Project used the training materials developed as a result of the DfE funded Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities Research Project, (Carpenter et al , 2012/ 2015) , to promote understanding and knowledge transfer around children’s Complex Needs . The goal was that this would impact on practice and increase opportunities for Inclusion.

Written by Jo Egerton, Senior Research Fellow for the ITIDE Project , based at Leeds Beckett University (and formerly Research Officer for the CLDD Project) this new module is designed to add fresh information to the suite of Complex Needs modules . This module is designed be used introduction to inclusion in education. It can be studied alone or as a gateway to the Complex Needs modules (www.complexneeds.org.uk).

http://inclusioneurope.wikispaces.com/

Engagement – From Principles to Practice

Read the first blog post on the new E4L – Engagement4Learning website.
Written by Professor Barry Carpenter.

Related Content:
Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities – (2015)

Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities