Autism and Girls

The Article below appeared in the Guardian (15th September 2018), giving new evidence and insight into the female presentation of Autism.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/sep/14/thousands-of-autistic-girls-and-women-going-undiagnosed-due-to-gender-bias

The article is based on an interview with Professor Francesca Happe, who is co – Editor of a forthcoming book on Autism and Girls, (details below)

Autism And Girls Book Flyer

Girls and Autism (Book Update)

Latest Update on Forthcoming Book ‘Girls and Autism’

Educational, Family and Personal Perspectives by Barry Carpenter, Francesca Happé and Jo Egerton

The book is now scheduled for launch on World Autism Day 2019 – 2nd April 2019.

See the flyer below for a chapter update & to view the full flyer.

Details of the Conference etc to follow shortly.

Girls & Autism Book Flyer

New picture books about work and volunteering will raise aspirations

Four new books, sponsored by the Department for Work and Pensions, have been produced by Books Beyond Words. They were warmly received at a Reception to Launch the Books in the House of Lords on 30th April. Baroness Sheila Hollins, Founder of Books Beyond Words, explained the background to the Project, and the process of developing the four books in tandem.

Professor Barry Carpenter, who co – authored with Dr Roger Banks, the book “Choosing my First Job”, spoke at the Launch about the challenge of Transition for young people with Learning Disabilities, and the potential of the books to reduce anxiety, and explain more clearly the rich array of post school opportunities.

For further information about the event, and details about where the books can be obtained from, follow the link below.

https://booksbeyondwords.co.uk/news/2018/4/30/new-picture-books-about-work-and-volunteering-will-raise-aspirations.

Barry Carpenter, speaking at a Books Beyond Words event

‘My Invisible Disability’ by Caitlin Hire (New Publication)

Caitlin Hire is a young woman with Autism, who through her teenage years has also experienced some issues with her Mental Health.
Through it all she has shown incredible inner strength and emotional resilience .

This is her story, in her own words, of her journey with Autism. She talks specifically about her struggles with the conventional school system, an experience common to many teenagers with AS.

Her story is full of insight , and will be a revelation to so many other young people, their families and professionals. Her account is poignant, and is told with great candour..”Masking is exhausting, but it’s what I need to do in this neurotypical world to survive.”

Caitlin has given permission for her story to be shared more widely, and ‘BarryCarpenterEducation’ is delighted to offer it as a free download below in .pdf format.

Click the cover image below to open & view Caitlin’s story.

Caitlin Hire - My Invisible Disability eBook cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girls & Autism (Forthcoming Book for 2018)

Girls and Autism

Educational, Family and Personal Perspectives by Barry Carpenter, Francesca Happe and Jo Egerton.

Click the thumbnail image below to download and view in full.Girls & Autism Upcoming Book Summary - thumbnail

 

Enabling Access; Effective Teaching and Learning for Pupils with Learning Difficulties (3rd Ed)

Publishers, Routledge , have launched a 3rd Edition of Enabling Access; Effective Teaching and Learning for Pupils with Learning Difficulties, to mark the seminal contribution of the book to the debate around the curricular needs of children and young people with learning difficulties.

Edited by Barry Carpenter, Rob Ashdown and Keith Bovair the book will appear in the Routledge Education Classic Edition series.

https://www.routledge.com/Enabling-Access-Effective-Teaching-and-Learning-for-Pupils-with-Learning/Carpenter-Ashdown-Bovair/p/book/9781138297159

Click thumbnail below to view more details (will open in a new tab)
Enabling Access (3rd) Edition Book Thumbnail Leaflet

Book Clubs for people with Learning Disabilities

Using the ‘wordless’ Books Beyond Words, (BBW), has given a new lease of life to Katie Carpenter, (a young woman with Down’s syndrome) who runs her own Book Club every month for her friends , and now works as a volunteer Book Club Leader in a new 19-25 educational provision for young adults with Learning Disabilities.

Here her Father, Barry Carpenter, describes the impact on Katie’s life, in terms of her daily functioning, friendships and releasing her leadership capacity.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/v3dxabn54fcjzkn/P1000412.MP4?dl=0

Katie Carpenter Photo Book Signing
Katie signing copies of her co authored book in the BBW series , “Going to Church .”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More information about the Books Beyond Words series can be obtained from www.booksbeyondwords.co.uk

Developing housing for young people with learning disabilities

This blog describes an initiative in the West Midlands led by MyLife.http://www.mylife.uk.com/

This guest blog comes from Professor Barry Carpenter CBE, chair of MyLife, a support service in Hartlepool and Moseley in Surrey enabling people with complex needs to live as independently as possible in the community.  Here, he describes MyLife’s new initiative in the West Midlands to support young people leaving education and preparing to live independently.

We all develop the desire to live independently and take control of our adult lives as we approach school-leaving age, and young people with special educational needs are no different.

But transitioning into employment and independent living is obviously more challenging for this group.  As a former headteacher, I’ve seen so many young people not do well because of a lack of support as they enter adulthood; they haven’t been able to secure a job, they remain dependent on their parents and lose confidence in their abilities.

MyLife is currently working in partnership with a school in the West Midlands to explore ways we can help young people with special needs better prepare for leaving education.

My daughter, Katie, has been the inspiration for this next stage of MyLife’s development.  She has Down’s Syndrome and she has shared a home with friends for eight years.  Now aged 30, she’s just about to start her first paid role with a school, running a ‘without words’ book club for children who find learning easier through images rather than text.

Katie has experienced numerous knock-backs but I believe the fact that she is independent and able to manage her own life has given her the self-esteem to withstand these setbacks and maintain her confidence.

And building this independence is what we are focusing on in the West Midlands.

A tenet of the revised Code of Practice for SEND is to offer young people support past the age of 19 and up to 25.  MyLife is working with Westminster School in Rowley Regis to develop their curriculum for this age group.

A key theme is ‘My Home’, and students will have access to a training flat where they can learn life-skills such as cooking, cleaning, registering with a doctor and taking public transport.

Alongside this we are looking at ways we can support the young people to live independently. This will involve sourcing a range of accommodation to meet their range of needs, be it a shared house, a flat of their own or supported living.  We shouldn’t just think that this model can only be available to people with low support needs; living as independently as possible should be available to people with the most complex needs as well.

It’s an exciting development of our services and one that we want to see expand.

The National Audit Office estimates that equipping a young person with the skills to live in even semi-independent housing could reduce support costs to the public purse by around £1 million.  It also suggests that supporting one person with a learning disability into employment could increase that person’s income by between 55 and 95 per cent.

But what is most important, both for young people and our communities, is that these skills give young people with additional needs, people like Katie, the chance to create a home for themselves where they can make their own choices, have friends to visit and have somewhere to recharge and truly relax.

 

Professor Barry Carpenter is Chair of the Advisory Board for Mylife.  A former headteacher of three special schools and a school inspector, he is currently Chair of the Autism and Girls Forum and the Complex Needs Training Review Group for the National Association of Special Educational Needs.

His innovative research project on children with complex learning disabilities in the UK is now being replicated in two major European projects and translated into major European languages.

He is a member of Health Education England Learning Disabilities Expert Reference Group for the Department of Health, and lead consultant for the South Australian Department of Education and Children’s Services.  He is also a director of Books Beyond Words.

To find out more about MyLife services go to http://www.mylife.uk.com/

 

Chair of the Rochford Review Endorses Complex Needs Book

Diane Rochford, the Chair of the Government’s Review on Assessment for children with SEND, has endorsed the popular book:

“Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities:A resource book for teachers and teaching assistants, (Routledge)”

“In the light of Government reforms in the assessment of children with SEND this is extremely timely. The book is profoundly significant in that it does what teaching was meant for and that is to place the child at the heart of learning”

– Diane Rochford

Acknowledging that the book is being widely used by Teachers and others in a variety of settings , the publishers are offering a 20% discount for a limited period. (see below):

This book is available to purchase direct from Routledge:

https://www.routledge.com/Engaging-Learners-with-Complex-Learning-Difficulties-and-Disabilities/Carpenter-Egerton-Cockbill-Bloom-Fotheringham-Rawson-Thistlethwaite/p/book/9780415812740

Click the thumbnail below for the review and discount details:

Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities
Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities. A resource book for teachers and teaching
assistants