Mental Health; the use of ‘Books Beyond Words’ for promoting Emotional Well Being in children with Learning Disabilities

Mental Health ; the use of Books Beyond Words for promoting Emotional Well Being in children with Learning Disabilities

Books Beyond Words - Thumbnail article image Annie Grant looks at how book clubs for older readers with learning disabilities are promoting good mental health and wellbeing

 

 

 

 

 

 

The NAHT Special Schools, Specialist and Alternative Provision Conference 2016..

The NAHT Special Schools, Specialist and Alternative Provision Conference 2016 theme is Promoting wellbeing for children, young people and staff (Thursday, 10th to Friday, 11th March, 2016) at The Hinckley Island Hotel, Leicestershire) .The link to the full conference description http://www.naht.org.uk/welcome/naht-events/conferences/send-conference-2016/)

Books to support Social, Emotional and Mental Health (SEMH)

As schools grapple with the challenges of implementing policy, pedagogy and practice around SEMH , they should certainly look at the potential offered in Books Beyond Words. Don’t be put off by the fact that there are no words! These books allow the emotional centres of the brain to express deep and complex emotions . They will be especially useful for a range of children and young people with SEND. The story format of each books  encourages emotional expression , and facilitates resolution to emotional issues that children with Autism , for example, do not find easy to decode.
There are a range of books that particularly support Personalised Learning too. Topics that we may find difficult to articulate to the child, or for which the bog standard leaflet has no relevance, (e.g., managing Type 1 Diabetes) are powerfully expressed through the medium of pictures, in a way that is comprehensible and informative to the child with SEND.
I have work with the Team at Books Beyond Words to classify from their catalogue those books most relevant to SEMH, and Personalised Learning . They will enrich our curriculum journeys in these areas considerably.

The experiences of family carers in the delivery of invasive clinical interventions for young people with complex intellectual disabilities:

The experiences of family carers in the delivery of invasive clinical interventions for young people with complex intellectual disabilities: policy disconnect or policy opportunity?

This is a little discussed topic , but one that faces many families of children and adults with an complex learning difficulty and disability.

Authors:Michael Brown, Louise Hoyle and Thanos Karatzias

Click thumbnail image below to download and view this article:

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