New EU Project on children with Complex Needs

This week a new EU funded Erasmus Project was launched in Graz, Austria.  This Project will take the extensively trialled Briefing Sheets for the UK CLDD Project   (Engagement4Learning) and translate them into several European languages.

The briefing sheets will then be used to support Inclusion of children with Special Needs in the representative EU countries. The Project will go through
various trial and development phases, through to 2018.

For more information please go to http://early-inclusion.eu

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Insights into children’s mental health and well-being

This briefing from the Office of National Statistics, (ONS) offers a useful profile of the latest trends in child mental health, and confirms a dramatic increase in mental ill health in Britain’s children.

Insights into children's mental health - Office for National Statisitcs
Insights into children’s mental health and wellbeing – Office for National Statistics (Click to download & view)

 

Children of the New Millennium; Mental Health Findings from the Millennium Cohort Study

This new Study form the Centre for Mental Health, gives current and very relevant facts and information on the current State of Mental Health in Britain’s children and young people.

Click the link below to view;

http://cdn.basw.co.uk/upload/basw_120221-1.pdf

New Report on the Impact of Early Support

In these times of cutbacks in Special Needs services, we need to remember the value of Early Intervention for families of very young children with SEN. The Early Support programme is something that we can rightly be proud of in this Country , and has been widely praised by Early Childhood Interventionists and Academics internationally.

This timely report by Dr Ana Teresa Brito reminds of the value of this programme for families.

 

Link to report

Preterm children need special attention in school

On average a primary school class will have four children born preterm, and many of them will have reduced cognitive capacity, social and behavioural difficulties and learning disabilities. Up to 70% of very preterm babies will require special educational needs services. But according to the National Forum for Neuroscience in Special Education, reported in an article in the latest issue of Children & Young People Now, few teachers are aware of this.

Barry Carpenter, visiting professor at the University of Worcester, is studying the educational outcomes and needs of preterm children in special schools, in partnership with SSAT and premature babies charity Bliss. He says addressing the educational needs of preterm children has become more urgent as advances in medical science have boosted survival rates – from 23% in 2000 to 63% today.

Vision is one sensory area that tends to get damaged. So teachers need to be aware that these children’s visual processing – the ability to read and decode – can be delayed, as can their language development.

SSAT will share the findings from Barry Carpenter’s studies in special schools for the benefit of mainstream schools, for example with a families workshop to share the strategies schools can use to meet this group’s needs. Stay informed by signing up to SSAT’s SEN e-forum.