Girls with Autistic Spectrum Condition [ASC]

Attached is a nasen SPECIAL in which an article on Autism and Girls appeared.

See extracted article below “Time for a rethink.”

(Click thumbnail image below to open as .pdf)

Girls with Autistic Spectrum Condition [ASC]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nasen, SEN Facts And Figures – ‘Time For A Rethink’ NASEN.ORG, 2015. full – special_extra_junel_2015_second pp (2)

 

Think Piece: How do we teach children with Complex Needs?

The new generation of children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), those with complex learning difficulties and disabilities (CLDD), have transformed the special needs registers of our schools in this first part of the 21st century (Carpenter et al., 2015). Many of these children are ‘wired differently’; children born prematurely, particularly those of pre-28 week gestation, are a particular example of this phenomenon (Carpenter and Egerton, 2013). Their profile of learning is not that which we have previously known with children with SEND. This brings unique challenges to teachers, for the neural pathways in the brain of the child with CLDD are connected and routed differently, and they, thus, learn differently. Therefore, in what ways do we teach differently?

This is a debate that is beyond differentiation, and takes us into the realms of new generation pedagogy, where personalisation becomes an essential component of the differentiated process of meeting individual needs.

Key to this pedagogy – ‘how’ we teach – is engagement (Carpenter et al., 2015). For any child of any ability without authentic engagement in learning there will be no meaningful outcomes, no effective progress, no real attainment. Engagement is the liberation of intrinsic motivation and the pathway to achievement. The engagement principle, delivered through the Engagement Profile and Scale (http://complexld.ssatrust.org.uk), enables a teacher to co – produce with the child, a truly responsive learning programme. This will style itself in ways appropriate to the presentation of the child’s complex needs. Autism, for example, is not merely the ‘classic’ presentation we knew in the late twentieth century, but now has multiple causal bases, all of which generate specific learning styles. Again, engagement can be key to ensuring high quality, responsive teaching (Carpenter et al., 2016).

From the extensive Department for Education-funded research conducted in the UK by Carpenter and colleagues, a range of resources were produced and are located on http://complexld.ssatrust.org.uk. Similarly the 16 modules written to support teacher training in the area of complex needs – ‘Training Materials for Educators of Learners with Severe, Profound and Complex Learning Difficulties’ (www.complexneeds.org.uk) – are now the focus of a European Commission-funded Erasmus+ programme to make these materials more widely available in Europe via a number of European languages to support inclusion practice through accredited vocational learning.

Our challenge in this 21st Century is to create inclusive pedagogy, regardless of setting. There are children entering our schools ‘the likes of which we have never seen before’. Engagement, as a well-researched principle for learning in all children, will be key to that inclusive pedagogy. We need to design a curriculum which wraps around the child with CLDD (Carpenter et al., 2011), and takes that child on a journey of effective teaching to enable us to touch that child at their point of learning need.

Professor Barry Carpenter, January 2016

References

Carpenter, B., Carpenter, J., Egerton, J. and Cockbill, B. (2016) ‘The Engagement for Learning Framework: Connecting with learning and evidencing progress for children with autism spectrum conditions’, Advances in Autism, 2 (1).

Carpenter, B. and Egerton, J. (2013) ‘The impact of prematurity on special educational needs’, Optimus Education (SEN hub). [Online at:http://www.optimus-education.com/impact-prematurity-special-educational-needs; accessed: 7.10.13]

Carpenter, B., Egerton, J., Brooks, T., Cockbill, B., Fotheringham, J. and Rawson, H. (2011) The Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities Research Project: Developing meaningful pathways to personalised learning (project report). London: Specialist Schools and Academies Trust (now The Schools Network). [Online at:http://complexld.ssatrust.org.uk/project-information.html; accessed: 21.3.12]

Carpenter, B., Egerton, J., Cockbill, B., Brooks, T., Fotheringham, J. and Rawson, H. (2015) Engaging Learners with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities: A resource book for teachers and teaching assistants. Abingdon: Routledge.

Coaching Conversations in Early Childhood Programs

This article is available for free download from www.isei.washington.edu

Coaching Conversations in Early Childhood Programs: The Contributions of Coach and Coachee
 
Gayatri Jayaraman, MEd; Christine Marvin, PhD; Lisa Knoche, PhD; Sue Bainter, MA 
Studies to date have linked early childhood (EC) coaching to child, family, and teacher outcomes but have not investigated “what” is happening in a coaching conversation. This exploratory study specifically unpacks nuances associated with the coaching conversation process and associations between the EC coaches’ behaviors and coachees’ participation during conversations. The results highlight conversation behaviors used by both EC coaches and coachees and how these behaviors may be associated with each other in building partnerships and promoting collaborative practices.
The conversational behaviors of 24 EC coach–coachee dyads were investigated by reviewing videotaped sessions of their meetings using a reliable Early Childhood Coaching Conversations coding system. Results indicated much variability in the use of conversation behaviors.
Bivariate correlations provided a hint of possible conversation behaviors associated with relationship building and a “shared ownership” process during coaching conversations. Implications for future work in research and practice are discussed.

Children with Complex Needs

When a child has Complex Learning Needs , there is no ‘quick fix’. The teacher will need to investigate, explore, search , to find out more about the styles of learning that will be effective in truly engaging the child. This is a process of Inquiry , that goes hand in hand with evidence based practice.
This was an inherent component of the national Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities Research Project in the UK, – (http://complexld.ssatrust.org.uk)

This new article by Dr Phyllis Jones and colleagues exemplifies how the process of Engagement , as the basis for effective pedagogy, links collaboratively with the Teacher process of Inquiry .

Article just published: Jones, P.; Churilla, I.; Demes, A.; Sadlo, R.; Sweeney, M.; & Pastore, H. (2015). Finding Ferdy: A Collaborative Inquiry About a Student with Complex Disabilities, The Canadian Journal for Teacher Research, 3,

http://www.teacherresearch.ca/blog/article/2015/12/27/283-finding-ferdy-a-collaborative-inquiry-about-a-student-with-complex-disabilities.

New EU Project on children with Complex Needs

This week a new EU funded Erasmus Project was launched in Graz, Austria.  This Project will take the extensively trialled Briefing Sheets for the UK CLDD Project   (Engagement4Learning) and translate them into several European languages.

The briefing sheets will then be used to support Inclusion of children with Special Needs in the representative EU countries. The Project will go through
various trial and development phases, through to 2018.

For more information please go to http://early-inclusion.eu

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Insights into children’s mental health and well-being

This briefing from the Office of National Statistics, (ONS) offers a useful profile of the latest trends in child mental health, and confirms a dramatic increase in mental ill health in Britain’s children.

Insights into children's mental health - Office for National Statisitcs
Insights into children’s mental health and wellbeing – Office for National Statistics (Click to download & view)

 

Children of the New Millennium; Mental Health Findings from the Millennium Cohort Study

This new Study form the Centre for Mental Health, gives current and very relevant facts and information on the current State of Mental Health in Britain’s children and young people.

Click the link below to view;

http://cdn.basw.co.uk/upload/basw_120221-1.pdf

New Report on the Impact of Early Support

In these times of cutbacks in Special Needs services, we need to remember the value of Early Intervention for families of very young children with SEN. The Early Support programme is something that we can rightly be proud of in this Country , and has been widely praised by Early Childhood Interventionists and Academics internationally.

This timely report by Dr Ana Teresa Brito reminds of the value of this programme for families.

 

Link to report

Preterm children need special attention in school

On average a primary school class will have four children born preterm, and many of them will have reduced cognitive capacity, social and behavioural difficulties and learning disabilities. Up to 70% of very preterm babies will require special educational needs services. But according to the National Forum for Neuroscience in Special Education, reported in an article in the latest issue of Children & Young People Now, few teachers are aware of this.

Barry Carpenter, visiting professor at the University of Worcester, is studying the educational outcomes and needs of preterm children in special schools, in partnership with SSAT and premature babies charity Bliss. He says addressing the educational needs of preterm children has become more urgent as advances in medical science have boosted survival rates – from 23% in 2000 to 63% today.

Vision is one sensory area that tends to get damaged. So teachers need to be aware that these children’s visual processing – the ability to read and decode – can be delayed, as can their language development.

SSAT will share the findings from Barry Carpenter’s studies in special schools for the benefit of mainstream schools, for example with a families workshop to share the strategies schools can use to meet this group’s needs. Stay informed by signing up to SSAT’s SEN e-forum.